User experience (UX) can quietly make or break a website. UX refers not to how a site looks, but how it functions for a user. A beautiful site will initially catch a visitor’s eye, but doesn’t guarantee the outcomes a website exists to create. Once your business or application has someone’s attention, it should guide them through interacting with the site easily and smoothly. Through retaining user attention and facilitating desired actions, a site that is easy to navigate simply produces better results.

Usability Across All Devices

Responsiveness and user experience are not the same thing, but they should work together in a well designed website. Responsiveness, which we will discuss further in the coming weeks, refers to a site’s ability to operate effectively and attractively across various devices, from the biggest monitor to the smallest smartphone. Good UX must hold up across devices. For designers, this means ensuring that important buttons and desired actions are placed well on all platforms. There is a trend toward “mobile first” design, since the limited space of a mobile device necessitates such intentional prioritization. Regardless of where you begin your design process, a website’s effectiveness hinges on its ease of use on all devices.

User experience is not about keeping up with current design trends. Remaining trendy and relevant is important, but UX should never suffer because of efforts to modernize. We recommend that highly visible businesses experiment with new designs about once a year and completely overhaul their look every two years. However, UX must remain consistently strong to ensure that customers can easily interact with the site after any changes are made. Your customers should never have to figure out how to make a purchase. They should be guided through it by an intuitive experience.

Define Your Calls to Action

Well defined calls to action are not exactly what we mean by UX. UX is about how your site executes its calls to action and facilitates the user’s interaction with your business. Amazon is a great example of this. We all know what Amazon wants its visitors to do – make a purchase and do it now. But notice how easy that make it for a user to comply. Their site prominently invites you to “add to cart” as soon as you are looking at a product. Amazon would never expect their users to fumble around to figure out how to send them money, and neither should you. Once your user is interested in answering your call to action, make sure they have an easy time doing so!

Great functionality requires some planning, but intentionally setting up your site to further your goals is essential. Don’t waste your time and money on a site that doesn’t optimize your visibility and sales. Invest in excellent UX early to get the most out of each user’s visit. You’ll see the results in repeat traffic and in your desired outcomes.